install theme
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yonghoonk:

Ann Demeulemeester narrates text from the essay ‘ON FRIENDSHIP’ by Ancient Roman Philosopher Marcus Tullius Cicero in a collaborative short film for thecorner.com

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yonghoonk:

Very rare footage of ”6.1 THE MEN”, the joint presentation of Yohji Yamamoto Pour Homme and Comme des Garçons Homme Plus F/W 1991 in Tokyo on June 1st, 1991.

This was the first time that both designers had presented their menswear in Japan. The shows were modeled by musicians, actors, and various other creatives - even some members of Yohji’s company, if I am not mistaken.

The two men being interviewed in the video are (in order) Haruomi Hosono and Yukihiro Takahashi of the legendary electronic trio Yellow Magic Orchestra, with the famed Ryuichi Sakamoto being the third member.

Below is a more thorough explanation of the show’s theme and significance, followed by an extremely valuable and hilarious first hand account of the show and a certain happening backstage, told by German guitarist Ottmar Liebert who was invited to model for the show - Courtesy of Asobu from Styleforum.

A/W 1991, as far as I know, showed in Paris at the end of January 1991 and then showed again together with CdG in Tokyo on June 1st and called “6.1 THE MEN”. Still one of the most talked about and coveted collections by Yohji fans in Japan from what I can tell, many of the pieces still catch quite large sums on the second hand market. The theme was “war”, several musicians including Charles Lloyd and John Cale (who also modeled in A/W04 btw) modeled the show and apparently sang some antiwar song together at the final part of the show (the collection was created and shown during the gulf war). Some of the signature pieces was the leather jacket with women prints on the back (he referenced this in “my dear bomb” as well, when he talked about nose art of american fighter planes being pictures of “girlfriends and sexy ladies” when heading into battle), zipper jackets and Joan Miró inspired blazers.

This is a great story from Ottmar Liebert about his experience when he walked the show, well worth the read.

"In 1991 the Japanese designer Yohji Yamamoto, together with Comme des Garçons, was putting on the first men’s fashion show in Japan and asked me to be one of his runway models. At the time Yohji prefered to use actors and musicians over models and he has also used athletes in the past. I flew to Tokyo from Los Angeles and was picked up at the airport and taken to a very nice hotel in Tokyo, which Frank Lloyd Wright had designed in the sixties. The show took place in the Olympic swim stadium of Tokyo, where the pool had been covered by a runway stage. On each end of the runway a huge wall was erected. Behind one wall Yamamoto was set up and behind the other wall Comme des Garçons. 

Comme des Garçons : Dennis Hopper, Trumpet player Don Cherry and his son Eagle-Eye Cherry (a TV presenter in the UK and not yet the pop star), British actor Julian something or other, Keyboardist Morgan Fisher (who later produced the wonderful CD “Miniatures” to which I contributed a piece)… 

Yohji Yamamoto : Charles Lloyd, Edgar Winter, a member of YMO (one of Japan’s most famous bands, which also featured Ryuichi Sakamoto)… Yohji and his people treated everyone wonderfully. And then he made a mistake on the day of the show. 

Thinking we were all men instead of the stars some felt they were, he offered as part of the refreshments Japanese cans of beer. In Japan cans are tiny, they are cute and many of the guys probably thought that one couldn’t possibly get drunk from drinking tiny cans of beer….well, if you drink a dozen of them you do get drunk, you know! And then a British pop singer asked a French rapper to turn down the crap on his boom-box and the French guy responded with his fist, which fractured the pop guy’s jaw. While he was rushed to the hospital Yohji’s people frantically searched for somebody who could wear his clothes…. In the end one of Yohji’s French employees took his place and wore the clothes well. I felt terribly embarassed. Here we were in one of the great cities of the world, guests of a real artist, and these men had to get into a fight. What a way to repay Yohji’s kindness! But fame is fleeting and karma instant.. I never heard from the British pop star and the French rapper again…

I remember how amazed we were at the Japanese audience. Some had waited since the early morning hours and yet, when the doors opened the first in line went to the last seat instead of claiming the best seat in the house. It was almost biblical…

One thing I remember about the show itself is that Yohji, who is a guitarist himself and also produced the soundtrack, had installed sound triggers along the runway. We were invited to step on those triggers, each of which controlled a different sound that would blast over the music. Car crashes, industrial sounds, drum breaks, glass breaking, guitar riffs etc…I also remember that the Brit who was walking ahead of me was drunk or high or both and thought that the crowd’s enthusiasm was directed at him instead of the clothing…I remember three or four people helping me change into the next outfit, grabbing shirts, pulling on shoes…I remember the late Don Cherry walking around on the runway like a court jester and greeting the other Comme des 
Garçons walkers…”

Times when Fashion really seemed to be about the passion and love for the beautiful creative work of these designers. Inspiring.

Reblogging with updated link, the video had been taken down.

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collectingknowledge:

*A must read / watch for anyone interested in the Japanese Fashion revolution of the early 80s - or actually, anyone interested in fashion. It is very important to know how fashion has changed since this era and this article / video is a very beautiful and valuable first hand account of the zeitgeist of those times.

Debra Scherer | Op-Ed | When Passion Was Everything | The Business of Fashion

Debra Scherer recalls the collaboration between Yohji Yamamoto and Irene Silvagni, and a time when the industry saw fashion with greater intensity.

NEW YORK, United States — When Irene Silvagni arrived at French Vogue in the mid-1980s, she (along with Colombe Pringle) recognised a new wave of photographers, models and, of course,  designers. She brought Peter Lindbergh, Paolo Roversi, Bruce Weber, Ellen Von Unwerth and a then unemployable Steven Meisel to the pages of Vogue, before they and their aesthetic were accepted by New York, London or Milan. And her support of new Japanese designers and a chance meeting with Yohji Yamamoto at a Comme des Garçons show led to one of the most beautiful and personal collaborations fashion has ever seen.

I was approached a few months ago by the team at Byronesque, a vintage e-commerce and editorial site, with some raw footage of Madame Silvagni recalling this collaboration and her role as creative director of Yohji Yamamoto during his most influential period. They had approached her about selling some of her original Yohji Yamamoto pieces and what was supposed to be a quick shoot became a full recounting of their collaboration.

At the time Silvagni recalls, in the mid-1980s and 1990s, I was working, first, as an assistant at American Vogue in New York and then, eventually, as a fashion editor at French Vogue in Paris and, as a result, had what you might call a front row seat to the whole thing. So after listening to the tapes, I said to the Byronesque team, “Ok, I think I can tell this story in a way that was more than just historical or nostalgic.”

It’s an excellent time to watch those old shows, to look at those clothes and think about them — think about how avant-garde both Yohji and Rei Kawakubo were when they began in 1981. As Madame Silvagni says in the film, “There were people fighting with fists outside after these shows.” It was still a time when passion was everything, when you didn’t just say “fab” and hurry off to the next show or store opening. Another thing that’s incredible to notice: there were no celebrities, everyone was actually watching the show, and looking at the clothes, with great intensity, sometimes with big smiles and always applause.

Look carefully and you will see the applause was not for Yohji the man, not for the cult of the celebrity designer, but rather, for the workmanship, the sensuality, the proportions, the way the fabric moved on the woman, the way each outfit was having a dialogue with the one that preceded it and the one the was to follow. There were no elaborate carrousels or millions of dollars worth of flowers or anything like that. The dresses, the hats, the suits, the girls, the way they walked, the way they floated, every outfit was like its own show. Every outfit, though they may have seemed simple, was a complicated sartorial expression. Yohji Yamamoto really understood a woman’s body, the proportional beauty and the ephemeral qualities that go along with that beauty.

I was lucky enough to be seated next to André Leon Talley at almost every show during that period and it was something I looked forward to as much as the show itself. We were inspired to reminisce about the days working together in New York, when we would wait for the haute couture gowns to arrive off of the Concorde, which landed at JFK around 5pm. Waiting and waiting for the trunks to arrive in the office as we pulled out masses and masses of yellow duchesse satin sent directly from the salon of Hubert de Givenchy. Ah, and I remembered his very Vogue way of teaching us about haute couture. He said, “You see, that is what makes couture couture, because when the fabric is like this you can just shake and wear.” This we remembered, all while waiting for the unbelievable yellow gown Yohji was about to send passed us.

Skip to the next season. I find my seat and, to my sadness and disappointment, André is nowhere to be found. I thought it was not possible he would miss this presentation, but the lights went down and they began the now infamous “wedding show.” And lo and behold, to my great delight, André was actually in the show, playing the groom.

Look at the clothes, look at the audience, just put down your phone for a minute (or 10 minutes) and really look. It’s emotional and inspiring, and a great reminder of how much has changed. The short film’s title, “Mono No Aware” refers to a Japanese literary concept that contains empathy towards the beauty of things as well as an awareness of the impermanence of these things and the gentle sadness that might evoke.

“Mono No Aware” will be presented next week in New York at Byronesque Offline, hosted by Michèle Lamy, Glenn O’Brien and Mazdak Rassi...

Reblogging with updated link, the video had been taken down.

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yonghoonk:

The lovely piece of fashion history that I was talking about in one of my recent posts.

While researching one of my newly discovered favourite designers / brands, (Christopher) Nemeth, I came across this video presentation of his work (presumably early - mid 80s).

The video itself is a rare piece of fashion history, and actually really fun to watch. It appears to be footage taken during a photoshoot, with narration describing what the pieces / looks being showcased are.

However, what I was referring to specifically when I said I discovered a lovely piece of fashion history was what you see in the stills above - one of the dressers / assistants are wearing a Comme des Garçons runway staff uniform printed with the words Printemps-Été 1986 Comme des Garçons Homme Plus. 

There are quite a few photos of the Spring / Summer 1986 Women’s mainline uniforms online. There are also quite a few of those pieces in circulation, being sold by vintage shops. This Homme Plus iteration, however, is quite rare and the only photo I could ever find of it is the last one above, taken from a Japanese gentleman’s Zozopeople blog.

The full video is well worth watching and I highly recommend it. Click


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yonghoonk:

Very rare footage of ”6.1 THE MEN”, the joint presentation of Yohji Yamamoto Pour Homme and Comme des Garçons Homme Plus F/W 1991 in Tokyo on June 1st, 1991.

This was the first time that both designers had presented their menswear in Japan. The shows were modeled by musicians, actors, and various other creatives - even some members of Yohji’s company, if I am not mistaken.

The two men being interviewed in the video are (in order) Haruomi Hosono and Yukihiro Takahashi of the legendary electronic trio Yellow Magic Orchestra, with the famed Ryuichi Sakamoto being the third member.

Below is a more thorough explanation of the show’s theme and significance, followed by an extremely valuable and hilarious first hand account of the show and a certain happening backstage, told by German guitarist Ottmar Liebert who was invited to model for the show - Courtesy of Asobu from Styleforum.

A/W 1991, as far as I know, showed in Paris at the end of January 1991 and then showed again together with CdG in Tokyo on June 1st and called “6.1 THE MEN”. Still one of the most talked about and coveted collections by Yohji fans in Japan from what I can tell, many of the pieces still catch quite large sums on the second hand market. The theme was “war”, several musicians including Charles Lloyd and John Cale (who also modeled in A/W04 btw) modeled the show and apparently sang some antiwar song together at the final part of the show (the collection was created and shown during the gulf war). Some of the signature pieces was the leather jacket with women prints on the back (he referenced this in “my dear bomb” as well, when he talked about nose art of american fighter planes being pictures of “girlfriends and sexy ladies” when heading into battle), zipper jackets and Joan Miró inspired blazers.

This is a great story from Ottmar Liebert about his experience when he walked the show, well worth the read.

"In 1991 the Japanese designer Yohji Yamamoto, together with Comme des Garçons, was putting on the first men’s fashion show in Japan and asked me to be one of his runway models. At the time Yohji prefered to use actors and musicians over models and he has also used athletes in the past. I flew to Tokyo from Los Angeles and was picked up at the airport and taken to a very nice hotel in Tokyo, which Frank Lloyd Wright had designed in the sixties. The show took place in the Olympic swim stadium of Tokyo, where the pool had been covered by a runway stage. On each end of the runway a huge wall was erected. Behind one wall Yamamoto was set up and behind the other wall Comme des Garçons. 

Comme des Garçons : Dennis Hopper, Trumpet player Don Cherry and his son Eagle-Eye Cherry (a TV presenter in the UK and not yet the pop star), British actor Julian something or other, Keyboardist Morgan Fisher (who later produced the wonderful CD “Miniatures” to which I contributed a piece)… 

Yohji Yamamoto : Charles Lloyd, Edgar Winter, a member of YMO (one of Japan’s most famous bands, which also featured Ryuichi Sakamoto)… Yohji and his people treated everyone wonderfully. And then he made a mistake on the day of the show. 

Thinking we were all men instead of the stars some felt they were, he offered as part of the refreshments Japanese cans of beer. In Japan cans are tiny, they are cute and many of the guys probably thought that one couldn’t possibly get drunk from drinking tiny cans of beer….well, if you drink a dozen of them you do get drunk, you know! And then a British pop singer asked a French rapper to turn down the crap on his boom-box and the French guy responded with his fist, which fractured the pop guy’s jaw. While he was rushed to the hospital Yohji’s people frantically searched for somebody who could wear his clothes…. In the end one of Yohji’s French employees took his place and wore the clothes well. I felt terribly embarassed. Here we were in one of the great cities of the world, guests of a real artist, and these men had to get into a fight. What a way to repay Yohji’s kindness! But fame is fleeting and karma instant.. I never heard from the British pop star and the French rapper again…

I remember how amazed we were at the Japanese audience. Some had waited since the early morning hours and yet, when the doors opened the first in line went to the last seat instead of claiming the best seat in the house. It was almost biblical…

One thing I remember about the show itself is that Yohji, who is a guitarist himself and also produced the soundtrack, had installed sound triggers along the runway. We were invited to step on those triggers, each of which controlled a different sound that would blast over the music. Car crashes, industrial sounds, drum breaks, glass breaking, guitar riffs etc…I also remember that the Brit who was walking ahead of me was drunk or high or both and thought that the crowd’s enthusiasm was directed at him instead of the clothing…I remember three or four people helping me change into the next outfit, grabbing shirts, pulling on shoes…I remember the late Don Cherry walking around on the runway like a court jester and greeting the other Comme des 
Garçons walkers…”

Times when Fashion really seemed to be about the passion and love for the beautiful creative work of these designers. Inspiring.

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Margiela, be mine | Sarah Mower | Vogue US | September 2008

     Few of my friends know this, but I’m conducting a relationship with an invisible man. He’s a 57 year old Belgian recluse who long ago disappeared behind an oblong strip of white tape, a label with nothing on it. His last known appearance was in 1994 in New York at the now defunct boutique Charivari, where he was seen to be a tall man in a flat cap, quietly driving journalists apoplectic by refusing to grant quotes about his collection.

     Since then, not a thing has been seen or heard of Martin Margiela : only robotic written pronouncements issued from a white painted former industrial design school occupied by men and women in white couture coats in the Eleventh Arrondissement of Paris. These days, rumors even circulate that this man, whose intelligence I adore and clothes I accumulate, doesn’t actually exist. Based on the public face of his work - his exaggerations, twists, puns, and strange appropriations - there are other people who shrug him off as one of the freakiest freak shows in fashion whose clothes could only be worn by avant - garde weirdos. Ha! How wrong can they be?

     Because on my side, it;s a case of abject Margiela dependency. Without him, my self image and ability to function in the world would be imperiled. Should some hideous fashion crep burgle my wardrobe tonight and make off with my navy blazer, sharp shouldered jackets, gorgeous black jersey one - shouldered gown, cap - sleeved day dress, three pairs of man  tailored pants, four shirts, various tube tops, skirts, belts, skinny scarves, Lucite wedges, pumps, bags, innumerable stockpile of T - shirts - oh, and that mad red lamé vest and chiffon cape - I’d wake up tomorrow with a shattered identity. It’s that bad.

[…]

     But Margiela is so secretive, even deliberately obscurantist, he rarely takes the credit for this. When you really analyze it, everything he does is one big dynamic contradiction. He’s a so called deconstructionist who is actually one of the best constructionists in the business. He’s an arch non - corporate - anti - brander whose operation is actually branded through and through, from the whitewashed walls and secondhand furniture of his shops to the lab coats of his staff and white canvas shopping bags, right down to the cotton envelopes into which his press communiqués are stitched. An early proponent of alternative street level fashion politics (he once literally showed on the Paris street, in the Métro, and in an abandoned supermarket), he is now master of luxury clothes and accessories, and launching a fine jewelry line and perfume with L’Oréal next year. And though he’s categorized by many as the most high - minded of intellectual designers, the way he converts one thing into another can be quite hilarious. Once, his people solemnly presented a boa to the press in a hushed showroom. It was a fat velveteen stuffed snake wrapped around a girl’s neck. A boa constrictor. I had such a fit of the giggles, I had to leave the room. On the other hand, it’s only right to appraise Margiela’s methods with the seriousness they deserve. In appropriating “found” objects and reassigning them as fashion products, he stands in a direct line from the Surrealists, Dadaists, and Junk Artists. One example is the white evening dress in his latest handmade collection. The bottom half is part of a silk mousseline dress; the top is made from two white plastic bags, complete with the handles.

     Lots of the things in my personal collection belong to the Replica line he occasionally drops into stores. They’re new, but a label inside each garment states its provenance : A BOY’S TAILORED JACKET, FRENCH, 1970S; AN EVENING CAPE, ITALIAN, 1980S; and so on. Is this “designer” creativity? No, just copies, honestly documented and brilliantly selected. Something else, too : while others have made a big noise about vintage, recycled materials, and sustainable sourcing in recent times, Margiela’s been practicing them for years.


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Thom Browne on his creative process

I always find that if you see something inspiring, you should look at it then almost immediately look away, because the one thing that is the most important to you, you will remember - and the rest of it will become yours because you won’t remember the whole thing. Especially these days, I think too much of what designers do and what alot of fashion is, are literal translations of what has been done in the past. In a way it’s great, I mean, people can wear it, but it’s not that interesting, and I would never want to fall into that kind of trap.

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Thom Browne on being “fashionable”

For me, the worst thing is seeing some guy that looks like he’s “wearing fashion”.

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blackparadox:

Merce Cunningham: Scenario 

ft. Designs by Rei Kawakubo

Merce Cunningham went exploring the endless possibilities within the range of motion of the human body life’s work. In his - developed together with the composer John Cage - aleatory way of working which he expanded by computer-generated movements since the 1990s, it the medium of dance with the movement itself was identical. At the same time always but he crossed the boundaries between the diverse genres of art by many renowned visual artists such as Robert Rauschenberg, Andy Warhol and Jasper Johns and composers such as John Cage, David Tudor and Earle Brown - to name just a few - could win kopräsente performance concepts to design his choreographies. 

One of the most unusual pieces he succeeded with his 1997 at Next Wave Festival at the Brooklyn Academy of Music premiered “Scenario” in cooperation with the Japanese fashion designer Rei Kawakubo, who presented their radical avant-garde collections under the label Comme des Garçons since 1973. Kawakubo gave Cunningham initially a rejection: “I do not understand anything from dance, I thought I could not take that job.” While working on their Frühjahrs-/Sommer-Kollektion 1997 “Body Meets Dress, Dress Meets Body” but then she decided to get involved in the experiment, and presented a draft that barely has something in common with traditional costumes: With extreme bulges and ridges at different parts of the body - on the shoulders, back, hip or buttocks - designed Kawakubo the lines of the dancer’s body in its own way, and, vice versa, take their costumes through the motions of the body is always new and unpredictable and sometimes strange and grotesque forms. Among the endless-flowing undulations of music by Takehisa Kosugi, in which to varying spectrum of sounds gradually electronic word alienation of A are interspersed to Z kidnapped “Scenario” the viewer into an-alien fascinating world in which deformation and beauty in a very peculiar way twinned with each other appear.

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PRESENT